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  • Winter Prayer

    Snowshoeing alone at night in the forest, a woman thinks – and prays – about the friends she loves, and the families they worry about.

  • A tale of shame and glory in the Southwest

    Hampton Sides’ new book, Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West, follows Kit Carson through the bloody history of the 19th century Southwest.

  • Notes from a place of risk and hope

    In Big Wonderful: Notes from Wyoming, Kevin Holdsworth describes his love for a harsh landscape in essays, poetry and fiction.

  • Don’t part out our national parks

    If the National Park Service allows commercial bio-prospecting in Yellowstone and our other parks, it will set a dangerous precedent.

  • A Western historian and a Western hero

    Las Vegas historian, author and community activist Hal Rothman may be dying from Lou Gehrig’s disease, but he’s determined to go on his own terms – with courage, grace and a sense of humor.

  • The West’s public lands are open for business

    A close look at the data shows that, despite some restrictions, oil and gas drilling is on the rise in the West.

  • Energy illusions

    A BLM report issued in late 2006 appears to show that less land is available for energy exploration now than in 2003, but a closer look shows that appearances are deceiving.

  • Red Feather builds homes and communities

    The nonprofit Red Feather Development Group recruits volunteers like Zan Wannemuehler to help build straw-bale homes on Indian reservations.

  • Condemned

    In Idaho and Wyoming, old eminent domain laws allow private entities to condemn landowners’ property – as Peter and Judy Riede discovered when J.R. Simplot Co. announced plans to expand its phosphate mine and build a road across their ranch.

  • Two weeks in the West

    Cross-country skiers and snowmobilers clash over access to Logan Canyon, Utah; Mount Jefferson, Mont.; and (of course) Yellowstone; Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth steps down to be replaced by Gail Kimbell; West becomes player in national politics; bor

  • Against the current

    For a long time, the West used water as if the supply were endless, but nowadays environmentalists are finding that too much efficiency causes problems of its own, especially in fragile ecosystems like the Colorado River Delta.

  • Heard around the West

    Do-it-yourself ski areas; “ecosexuals”; “prescription dog” comes home; Utah’s Radium Stadium; illegal immigrants build fence to keep themselves out; it’s a long way from Sydney, Australia, to Sidney, Mont.

  • The great wilderness compromise

    Both sides of the contentious debate over a proposed Idaho wilderness bill invoke Howard Zahniser, father of the Wilderness Act -- and both sides have a point.

  • How to be #1 in the world and still be a loser

    Giles Slade’s new book, Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America, is a fascinating intellectual history of how marketers demolished the American tradition of thrift.

  • A family of criminals and killers

    In All God’s Children: Inside the Dark and Violent World of Street Families, Rene Denfeld tells the disturbing story of Portland’s teen runaways, charting the path that took one of them, Danielle Marie Cox, from honor student to convicted murderer.

  • Why operation of wildlife refuges shouldn't be privatized

    The debacle on the National Bison Range is a prime example of why the management of wildlife refuges should not be privatized.

  • How the Indians were set up to fail at bison management

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, not the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, is to blame for alleged management problems at the National Bison Range in Montana.

  • History of a decline

    An illustrated timeline charts the appearance of dams on the lower Snake River and the resulting decline of salmon, along with the so-far-inadequate response of the federal government.

  • Fill 'er up with moonshine

    Chris Myles plans to fuel his vehicles with homebrewed ethanol, made in a still he built at his home in Silverton, Colo.

  • Two weeks in the West

    Snow and drought plagues West; governors tackle global warming; Big Coal gets bigger; Navajos protest power plant; stadium in former shipyard; Colorado easements cost taxes; wildlife crosswalk; zebra mussels arrive; skiing and snowboarding

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