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  • Who loses when a city neighborhood goes upscale?

    Longtime residents of Alberta Street and other neighborhoods in Northeast Portland, Ore., have survived poverty and drive-by shootings and now face a new challenge in the growing gentrification of the area.

  • We are shaped by the sound of wind, the slant of sunlight

    In the leading article of this essay issue, a writer says that nature writing is about much more than nature - it is about community, morality, character and hope as well.

  • Riding the Wyoming 'brand'

    Wyoming's brand of insider politics is keeping the state in thrall to extractive industries and out of step with the rest of the West.

  • Global Warming's Unlikely Harbingers

    Mountain pine beetles are attacking more forests and more varieties of trees — and thriving at higher elevations than ever before — and some scientists believe global climate change is at the root of the problem

  • Follow-up

    Judge rules citizens can petition to have "candidate" species listed as endangered; genetically engineered salmon eat regular salmon; genetically engineered corn planted in Colorado; Energy Department plans to ship weapons grade plutonium and enriched ura

  • Buying time against the energy assault

    Bidding on oil and gas leases for conservation purposes in places like Delta County, Colo., could prove to be a risky strategy, some environmentalists warn

  • At Yucca Mountain, deadlines take precedence over science

    The Bush administration is ignoring the warnings of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board created by Congress, and is racing ahead with its plans to store nuclear waste at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain

  • Greenhouse gases go underground

    Plans for permanently storing carbon dioxide in oil fields will benefit energy companies who already use carbon dioxide injection to boost output.

  • The New West collides with open-range laws

    As the West grows and develops, more people find themselves drawn into the conflict over open-range laws

  • Wildlife win one in Yellowstone

    The National Wildlife Federation negotiates two important land deals with ranchers in the Yellowstone area, ending grazing on Horse Butte and protecting local bison

  • Clean water changes could sully Western streambeds

    If the Bush administration pushes through a rule change to the Clean Water Act, three-fourths of the West’s rivers would be unprotected from pollution

  • Dear Friends

    Life for interns after HCN; tell us what you think in our annual survey.

  • Fatalities in the energy fields: 2000-2006

    At least 89 people died in the energy fields of Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming during the last six years

  • Will Dombeck sock it to rebellious supervisors?

    Now retired Forest Supervisor Tom Kovalicky, who tried to restrain the logging on his Nez Perce National Forest, says Mike Dombeck has to break the logging cycle in the agency.

  • Private rights vs. public lands: Thousands of inholdingscreate conflicts inside federal lands

    A ranching family's desire to develop a road to an inholding in Arizona's Arrastra Mounain Wilderness is a microcosm of the huge and unwieldy problem of inholdings on public lands throughout the West.

  • A radical approach to mine reclamation

    The Sunnyside Mine near Silverton, Colo., is an unusual example of a community working together with miners and environmentalists to find a strategy to heal the damage.

  • Turning the Old West into the New West

    The old mining town of Anaconda, Mont., has turned a mine dump into a designer golf course.

  • If a town is more dead than alive, it's the Old West

    Musing on the gravestones in Anaconda, Mont., a writer theorizes that one can tell whether a town is Old West or New West by the ratio of the buried to the currently alive inhabitants.

  • Gardening old-style with my great-uncle Alfred in Seattle

    The other day my great-uncle Alfred gave me a handful of the year's green beans, dried and ready for planting next summer. "Give them something high up to grow on," he told me. "They'll grow 7 feet tall."

  • Walking in Portland can be dangerous to your health

    Last week another vehicle almost nailed me flat as a coffin. I was alone in a crosswalk in the center of Oregon's most worldly city, Portland. I had been walking uphill and had made it six blocks west of the Willamette River.

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