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  • Beauty and the Beast: The president's new monument forces southern Utah to face its tourism future

    As the small, conservative towns bordering Utah's new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument begin to adapt to the monument they never wanted, a new vision for what gateway communities and preserved areas might be begins to slowly emerge.

  • The Mojave National Preserve: 1.4 million acres of contradictions

    California's new Mojave National Preserve, touted as "a park for the 21st century," seeks to remain primitive and to avoid alienating the small communities in and around the preserve.

  • Beauty and the Beast: The president's new monument forces southern Utah to face its tourism future

    As the small, conservative towns bordering Utah's new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument begin to adapt to the monument they never wanted, a new vision for what gateway communities and preserved areas might be begins to slowly emerge.

  • Big Sky, big mess in Montana

    A Montana ski resort originally created by newsman Chet Huntley and intended to be a model of free-market, unconstrained development, is today a morass of lawsuits, environmental degradation and inefficiency.

  • Working the Watershed

    An unusual group founded by environmentalists and logging companies, the Willapa Alliance seeks to bring economic and ecological healing to Washington's Willapa Bay.

  • Hunters close ranks, and minds

    The notorious self-censorship the hunting press showed when "Outdoor Life" pulled biologist Tom Beck's article critical of bear baiting leads to speculations by an outdoor writer on why hunters are so thin-skinned about criticism.

  • No home on the range

    The deliberate slaughter of bison straying from Yellowstone National Park - killed because the brucellosis they may carry might endanger livestock - provokes a storm of protest, and calls into question the concept of wildlife management in the park.

  • Bringing back the bighorn

    The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep has fought its way back from near extinction, but efforts to reintroduce it to all its former range are more difficult than they appear.

  • Bees under siege

    Honeybees across the West - and the nation - are dying in huge numbers, and some think a pesticide, methyl parathion, may be the primary killer.

  • El Nuevo West

    Spanish-speaking, often underestimated immigrant workers keep the West's ski resorts running in the face of INS raids, discrimination and other trials.

  • Motorheads: The new, noisy, organized force in the West

    Well-organized and well-heeled, off-road vehicle users constitute a large and powerful group aiming to stake its claim to the West's public lands.

  • The Republicans now own the West

    A state-by-state review of the national elections reveals a West given over to Republicans.

  • Pollution in paradise

    Idaho's beautiful Silver Valley and Lake Coeur d'Alene build a new resort economy on a toxic stew of mining waste.

  • Cease-fire called on the Animas-La Plata front

    Colorado's Animas-La Plata project - the last of the big BuRec projects, and the most mired in controvery - is tackled by opponents and proponents who seek consensus.

  • Colorado voters decide fate of 3 million acres

    Colorado's Amendment 16 would allow state school trust lands to be managed for values other than money - and some fear that would mean harm to Colorado school budgets.

  • Will Idaho voters derail nuclear trains?

    Idaho's Proposition 3 would void Gov. Phil Batt's deal to bring some nuclear waste into the state and would require that all such agreements in the future have citizen approval.

  • An 'unfair, inflexible' bid to clean Montana's water

    Montana's Clean Water Initiative arouses fierce industry protest with its plan to keep long-lived hardrock mining wastes out of the water.

  • Polluted waters divide Oregon

    The Oregon Clean Streams Initiative, if passed, would enact the toughest grazing restrictions in the West in an attempt to keep cattle from fouling the waters.

  • Has big money doomed direct democracy?

    The use of initiatives and referenda - direct democracy - to change the law for environmental reasons faces a challenge when big money enters the picture.

  • Nevada: Who hates nuclear waste most?

    In Nevada, a tight race for Congress has Republican John Ensign and Democrat Bob Coffin arguing over which of them hates the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Repository the most.

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