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  • Predator hunters for the environment

    The group Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife has helped to protect a lot of Western land and wildlife – while doing its best to kill off as many predators as possible

  • Brave New Hay

    Monsanto’s genetically modified Roundup Ready alfalfa may take over the West, as the company re-engineers the world to conform to its business plan

  • Problems in Paradise

    The brutal murder of a Japanese tourist shines an unwelcome spotlight on the social problems plaguing Arizona’s beautiful but troubled Havasupai Reservation

  • The Battle for the Verde

    The Verde River is one of Arizona’s last free-flowing stream, but environmental and local activists fear an ambitious planned pipeline, designed to bring groundwater to the growing Prescott area, will end up sucking the river dry

  • Rural Education 2.0

    Rural Education 2.0

    Tiny Vilas, Colo., thought it was a great idea to open an online school and enroll at-risk students from far-away Denver – but neither the students nor the school district ended up scoring well at report card time

  • Phoenix Falling?

    Craig Childs lifts the rug of modern-day Phoenix, Ariz., to examine the remnants of the civilization that preceded it – the Hohokam people, who also built a great city in the middle of the desert, and flourished until the day they ran out of water.

  • Disposable workers of the oil and gas fields

    Without a college degree, work on the oil and gas fields is the best job you can get in the rural West – unless, of course, it kills you

  • The Silence of the Bees

    Migratory beekeeper John Miller hauls his hives across the West, pollinating everything from almonds to apples, but a nasty parasite and a mysterious disorder are making life much harder for John and his buzzing business partners.

  • Wish You Weren’t Here

    Quagga mussels – an extraordinarily prolific and costly invasive species – have appeared in Lake Mead, and no one is sure how to keep these unwanted newcomers from infesting the West.

  • One Nation, Under Fire

    The Sonoran Desert homeland of the Tohono O’odham Nation has become a nerve-wracking police state, caught in the crossfire between drug and immigrant smugglers and the U.S. Border Patrol.

  • The Efficiency Paradox

    Water efficiency has long been touted as a silver bullet for the West’s water problems, but too much efficiency can cause problems of its own, especially in the fragile Colorado River Delta.

  • Salmon Justice

    Judge Jim Redden has given the Bush administration an ultimatum: Submit a viable plan for salmon restoration, or face the possible removal of four dams on the lower Snake River.

  • Confessions of a Methane Floozy

    An environmentalist who owns royalty interest in New Mexico oil and gas wells heads down to the San Juan Basin to talk to rancher Tweeti Blancett, driller Tom Dugan and others about the moral complexities inherent in Americans’ energy use

  • Old but Faithful

    Former Park Service supervisors Bill Wade and Rob Arnberger formed the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees to defend the national parks from what they see as the Bush administration’s ill-conceived changes

  • The West: A New Center of Power

    The West gains traction as a center of power in 2006, and nine more indicators from the midterm elections.

  • Bred for success

    The Peregrine Fund has mastered the art of breeding aplomado falcons and other endangered birds of prey, but critics say the organization is blind to the importance of wildlife habitat

  • Peace Breaks Out In New Mexico's Forests

    In northern New Mexico, the Collaborative Forest Restoration Program brings Hispanic loggers and Anglo environmentalists together to work on creating healthy, sustainable forests and rural economies

  • A River Once More

    In Oregon, a revolutionary community alliance is working to put water – and steelhead trout – back into the Deschutes River

  • From the ground up

    The Crested Butte News, a successful independent newspaper in a small Rocky Mountain town, has come full circle and is once again owned by a chain

  • Going Big

    Mountain bikers are finally winning respect, along with increased access to trails, but a growing breed of gonzo riders with heavy, fast, high-tech bikes -- and a thirst for riding in wilderness – could threaten all that.

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