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  • What’s the NRA’s beef with roadless areas?

    A hunter and member of the National Rifle Association is angry at the way the group puts gun ownership above roadless areas, wildlife, and hunting

  • Backcountry Ranger

    Backcountry seasonal ranger Tony Prendergast has spent much of the past six summers working in western Colorado’s Gunnison National Forest

  • Scandal and war fracture conservative coalition

    The war in Vietnam destroyed a long-lasting liberal coalition; now, political scandals and the war in Iraq are threatening the conservative coalition that took its place

  • Vine Deloria Jr.: Writer, scholar and inspired trickster

    Vine Deloria Jr., author of Custer Died for Your Sins, is remembered as a witty, impassioned and iconoclastic writer, historian, and teacher, who fought for Indian peoples and their right to self-determination

  • Alvin Josephy: A gentle, graceful advocate for sovereignty

    Writer and historian Alvin Josephy is remembered as a good friend to Indian people, especially the Nez Perce Tribe

  • Wheelchairs and wilderness can coexist

    Accessible trails for wheelchair users should be a part of new wilderness legislation

  • ‘Death is stingless indeed and as beautiful as life’

    Writer and activist Michael Frome looks back on more than 80 years of a life filled concern for the environment and social justice

  • In Washington, the most outrageous sins are legal

    Given the incestuous nature of politics and lobbying in Washington, D.C., and the corruption inherent in the gambling industry, the rise of an opportunist like Jack Abramoff was all but inevitable

  • The day they close the pass

    As mountain towns get more accessible and lively, even in midwinter, the author relishes the way his tiny, remote town slows to a stop once the mountain pass highway is closed for the season

  • Are we ready to learn the lessons of fire and flood?

    Sen. Larry Craig’s suggestion that New Orleans’ 9th Ward be restored as a wetland may represent a newfound respect for the power of nature and the limits of the human ability to control it

  • The end of something really big

    The chance to see a huge dead whale draws "carcass tourists" to the California coast

  • In Bush's Supreme Court, who's on first?

    Newly confirmed Chief Justice John Roberts may not be the umpire he claims to be, but he could be worse: a counter-revolutionary, like Judge Janice Rogers Brown

  • Inside the fall

    A writer celebrates finding happiness and finding herself, as she romps with her children in the beautiful season of autumn

  • Blood spills over a $14 camping fee

    In the wake of a confrontation over a camping fee that ended in a tourist’s death, a former park ranger remembers a frightening incident from his own career

  • Yellowstone's Grizzlies A success story

    The National Wildlife Federation believes that the federal government’s proposal to remove Yellowstone’s grizzlies from the endangered species list represents a tremendous achievement

  • Dam breaching gets a surprise endorsement

    A longtime consultant to the hydropower industry, biologist Don Chapman, shook the Northwest this summer when he declared that four dams on the Lower Snake River should be breached to save the salmon

  • Yellowstone’s Grizzlies Not out of the woods yet

    Many environmentalists say the Yellowstone grizzly is a long way from being recovered, and that delisting the bear is premature and could spell disaster for the species

  • The meeting of heaven and earth

    A park ranger talks about the increasing practice of mourners scattering the ashes of loved ones outdoors in national parks.

  • The return of the hodgepodge

    The new transportation bill makes the day-to-day working of transportation policy more political than it’s ever been – and also serves up some amazing helpings of pork

  • Cano's Vision

    In the little town of Antonito, Colo., a local eccentric known as Cano is using salvaged materials like beer cans, hubcaps and scrap lumber to create an extraordinary shrine called "El Castillo."

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