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  • Ode to a public lands experiment

    It may have lovely photographs, but Valles Caldera: A Vision for New Mexico’s National Reserve is much more than just another coffee-table book.

  • A tale of shame and glory in the Southwest

    Hampton Sides’ new book, Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West, follows Kit Carson through the bloody history of the 19th century Southwest.

  • Notes from a place of risk and hope

    In Big Wonderful: Notes from Wyoming, Kevin Holdsworth describes his love for a harsh landscape in essays, poetry and fiction.

  • How to be #1 in the world and still be a loser

    Giles Slade’s new book, Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America, is a fascinating intellectual history of how marketers demolished the American tradition of thrift.

  • A family of criminals and killers

    In All God’s Children: Inside the Dark and Violent World of Street Families, Rene Denfeld tells the disturbing story of Portland’s teen runaways, charting the path that took one of them, Danielle Marie Cox, from honor student to convicted murderer.

  • A corps of visitors, not discoverers

    In Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes, the late historian Alvin Josephy Jr. has assembled essays by nine Indian writers who examine the Corps of Discovery from the other side of the cultural looking glass

  • The art of an alien landscape

    In Westernness: A Meditation, poet and scholar Alan Williamson examines what it means to live in the West through the eyes of the region’s writers and artists

  • Dancing to Biederbecke in Montana

    In The Willow Field, his first novel, memoirist William Kittredge serves up an old-fashioned potboiler

  • Travels in a sublime wasteland

    In Sunshot: Peril and Wonder in the Grand Desierto, writer Bill Broyles and photographer Michael Berman explore the gritty desert on the U.S.-Mexico borderlands

  • The West can govern itself

    In his new book, "This Sovereign Land," Daniel Kemmis argues that it is time for the national government to give local governments more power over public lands in the West.

  • Building off the grid

    Rex and LaVonne Ewing wrote Logs, Wind and Sun to share what they learned in the process of building their dream house, creating a book that is both informative and enjoyable.

  • A gilded wrinkle in time

    In Cities of Gold, his first historical novel, William K. Hartmann interweaves the conquistadors of the 16th with a contemporary murder mystery in Tucson.

  • Remembering our wildness

    In The Animal Dialogues, Colorado author Craig Childs writes of chance encounters with wild animals.

  • Finding beauty in devastation

    In his richly illustrated book Boy Wonder & the Big Burns, Montana photographer Chris Peterson finds beauty in the aftermath of fire – and in his relationship with his autistic son.

  • ‘Men standing in the shadows began to weep’

    Writers John N. Maclean and Mark Matthews look closely at two famous – and deadly – Western wildfires in their new books, The Thirtymile Fire and A Great Day to Fight Fire.

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