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  • Caribou population still too small

    Woodland caribou populations are still too small in Selkirks.

  • Say what?

    Park Service considers procedural changes and asks advice about de-jargonizing.

  • Bambi takes a hunter safety course

    The book "Stormy and The New Forest" by Tom Storm is reviewed.

  • Home on the electric range

    Rancher robot display defends grazing at New Mexico State Fair.

  • Pay to play

    The Southwest Idaho Mountain Biking Association believes mountain bikers should pay to use trails on public lands.

  • Celebrate the West

    Celebrate the West gathering in Jackson will honor Western historian Alvin Josephy.

  • Witness

    Witness: Endangered Species of North America uses photographs to draw attention to the Endangered Species Act.

  • Come into the forest

    The Changing Forest museum exhibit teaches about ponderosa pine forests.

  • Uncontrollable coyote

    Wayne Grady's book The World of the Coyote celebrates this predator.

  • Wilderness Act at 30

    The Wilderness Act Handbook is reissued by The Wilderness Society.

  • Green Classifieds

    Student Conservation Association publishes guide to green jobs.

  • Timber industry takes a stand

    The timber industry responds to the Sierra Club's book, Clearcut, with its side of the story in its own book, Closer Look.

  • Organizing citizens for the next 20 years

    The Workbook offers advice to activists.

  • Leopold floats us to an understanding

    Chip Rawlins reviews A View of the River by Luna Leopold.

  • Evolving wetlands

    Sixth annual conference of Colorado Riparian Association meets in Alamosa.

  • Peak writing experience

    Native American Writers Forum meets in Telluride.

  • False alarm

    General Accounting Office report proves that environmental nonprofits do not make money on land transactions.

  • Save the temperate forests

    Second International Temperate Forest Conference meets in Missoula.

  • No room at the top

    American Mountain Foundation tries to save Colorado's "Fourteeners" from being loved to death by climbers.

  • A climbing plan for Devils Tower

    Park Service tries to develop a climbing management plan that will satisfy Native Americans who regard Devils Tower as sacred.

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