Sidebar

  • Open space initiative offers hope

    The Lake County Open Space Initiative has preserved land around Leadville and created trails for cross-country skiing and other recreation, but some local politicians say it’s snatching up too much private land and water.

  • “They want the workers to be invisible”

    Former Leadville miner Bob Elder decries the exploitation of service workers who have to commute from Leadville to jobs in the resort counties. Jim Zoller, a former miner who now works as Leadville’s police chief, thinks that a lot of his town’s problems

  • Brownfields program makes cleanup profitable

    The "Brownfields" program, an offshoot of Superfund, is designed to redevelop contaminated sites into real estate, but critics say it is not always up to the challenge.

  • Superfund: On the Hill… on the ground

    Timelines trace the birth, life and decline of the Superfund law, both on Capitol Hill and on the ground in the West.

  • Across the Columbia, a game of catch-up

    Vancouver, Wash., has a rapidly growing population, many of them people who can't afford to live where they work, across the river in Portland, Ore.

  • New Urbanism creates living communities

    Orenco Station, a new development in a suburb of Portland, uses principles of the New Urbanism movement to create a vibrant, livable community

  • It's more than a house, it's a fantasy life

    The sales pitch for the Silver Bow Club, a gated ranch community proposed for Montana's Big Hole River, weighs 12 pounds and encourages vivid lifestyle fantasies.

  • Gated communities go in with a bang

    Exclusive gated communities such as Montana's Yellowstone Club impact the land as well as the social fabric.

  • Rural residents bring fierce friends

    Wildlife biologists are looking at the ways animals adapt -- or fail to adapt -- to developed areas outside of cities, such as campgrounds, rural subdivisions and ranchlands.

  • Flow charts for the Golden State

    The Water Education Foundation's beautiful color maps make California's natural and human-made water systems comprehensible, even for the layperson.

  • Dam busters win symbolic victory

    California anvironmentalists are pleased that the Bureau of Reclamation has given up on completing the planned Auburn Dam for the Middle Fork of the American River.

  • Some see economic upside in loss of farm water

    Fallowing land in California's Imperial Valley may temporarily put farmworkers out of work, but in the long run the extra money could help diversify the local economy and produce more skilled and permanent jobs.

  • One Colorado county takes a stand

    Poor but coal-rich Delta County, Colo., made history when its county commissioners, responding to a determined citizens' movement, voted to deny four coalbed methane test wells and attach conditions to the drilling of a fifth.

  • Another way to win back land

    The Timbisha Shoshone have won control of 314 acres with water rights in California's Death Valley National Park, and have gained shared management responsibilities for another 300,000 acres in the park, along with 7,400 acres of nearby federal land.

  • Can money buy happiness?

    Some Native Americans warn that the unexpected arrival of money in the form of claim payments can have harmful impacts on impoverished tribes.