Perspective

  • High Country

    In an early "High Country News" editorial, reprinted here, Tom Bell took on then-Governor of Wyoming Stanley K. Hathaway.

  • Marc Racicot: One of the would-be president's men

    Montana Gov. Marc Racicot, R, is a popular politician and a likable man, but environmentalists say his support of shooting wandering Yellowstone bison shows how weak his environmental record is.

  • Protesters raised the right questions

    After the World Trade Organization protests ended in Seattle, Wash., questions remain about global trade, environmental issues and the way the world is changing.

  • In this election, the West is lost

    Western issues and environmental issues in general don't seem to be visible on the political screen in Washington, D.C., even as the presidential race heats up.

  • In Washington, the emperor is on Babbitt's side

    In Washington, D.C., Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt battles Western Republicans over the use of the 1906 Antiquities Act to preserve Western land for the public.

  • Keeping 'em down on the High Plains

    The incestuous relationship between the oil and gas industry and the Wyoming government is finally being challenged through a state Supreme Court decision that ruled against Exxon.

  • Battered borderlands

    As the number of illegal immigrants crossing the Sonoran Desert into Arizona rises, the Border Patrol is faced with the need to protect a fragile environment at the same time that it polices the border.

  • Do you want more wilderness? Good luck

    Despite growing public support for more wilderness, Congress is unlikely to add any acreage, for a variety of political and even philosophical reasons.

  • Never underestimate a working majority

    The working majority in Congress enforces or ignores Rule 16 as it pleases - the rule that prevents policy-making amendments being added to appropriations bills.

  • The quiet Takings Project is trespassing on democracy

    The Takings Project and its mastermind, law professor Richard Epstein, are trying to put a stop to any federal or state regulation of business and property, and despite their flawed reasoning, many conservative judges are under their influence.

  • The river comes last

    The Montana Legislature ratifies a water compact with the Crow Indian Tribe that favors consumptive users of the water at the expense of the Bighorn River itself, and of the world-class trout fishery in Bighorn Lake.

  • New twist in an old law has everyone screaming

    Solicitor John Leshy of the Interior Dept., an expert on the 1872 Mining Law, has the industry screaming and politicians in turmoil over his decision to enforce a long-neglected provision of the law, which allows only a few acres per mining claim.

  • Congress searches for a 'green conspiracy'

    In a spirit of overreaction reminiscent of McCarthyism, Alaska Republican Don Young sets up a task force to investigate what he calls the "Warner Creek Timber Sale Eco-terrorism" - a protest on the Willamette Nat'l Forest in Oregon resulting in arrests.

  • Take the green elephant off the endangered list

    Republican environmentalists are making a comeback in Congress.

  • Beware Alaskans bearing gifts

    Conservative Alaska Rep. Don Young is sponsoring a bill to buy more land for the public domain, but environmentalists are not cheering.