Perspective

  • Yellowstone's last stampede

    A visit to Yellowstone in winter leads to encounters with park employees eager for (and snowmobilers vehemently against) the coming banishment of snowmobiles from the national park.

  • Weirdness abounds in Washington

    His choices of Gale Norton for Interior Secretary and John Ashcroft for Attorney General show that George W. Bush has already abandoned bipartisanship.

  • A 'most improbable scenerio' has come to pass

    HCN's political columnist considers the recent, weird and not-quite-finished election, and suggests that if George Bush turns out to be the winner, he will have to govern from the middle, which could prove good news for the environment.

  • CARA's not quite the girl she used to be

    Despite its tremendous original support, CARA (the Conservation and Resource Act of 1999) has come through Congress much changed and reduced.

  • In presidential politics, the West has a bad hand

    A longtime political observer explains how it is that a huge region like the West has a rather minimal influence on national presidential elections.

  • The latest salmon plan heads toward a train wreck

    The long-awaited federal plan for saving the Northwest's endangered salmon avoids the question of breaching dams and satisfies almost no one.

  • Can 'property rightsniks' stop a popular bill?

    The Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 2000, which would guarantee permanent funding for 15 years for buying land for conservation, has broad support but still faces an interesting dance through a complicated Congress.

  • Yes, we need the rural West

    The rural West is still important and is central to the struggle to restore the landscape and wildlife of the region.

  • Do we really need the rural West?

    A Las Vegas historian argues that the rural West is nothing but an anachronism that means nothing in today's New West.

  • High Country

    In an early "High Country News" editorial, reprinted here, Tom Bell took on then-Governor of Wyoming Stanley K. Hathaway.

  • Marc Racicot: One of the would-be president's men

    Montana Gov. Marc Racicot, R, is a popular politician and a likable man, but environmentalists say his support of shooting wandering Yellowstone bison shows how weak his environmental record is.

  • Protesters raised the right questions

    After the World Trade Organization protests ended in Seattle, Wash., questions remain about global trade, environmental issues and the way the world is changing.

  • In this election, the West is lost

    Western issues and environmental issues in general don't seem to be visible on the political screen in Washington, D.C., even as the presidential race heats up.

  • In Washington, the emperor is on Babbitt's side

    In Washington, D.C., Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt battles Western Republicans over the use of the 1906 Antiquities Act to preserve Western land for the public.

  • Keeping 'em down on the High Plains

    The incestuous relationship between the oil and gas industry and the Wyoming government is finally being challenged through a state Supreme Court decision that ruled against Exxon.