Perspective

  • New forest chief becomes a lame duck

    Soon after regional forester Brad Powell signed the revolutionary, controversial Sierra Nevada Framework, Forest Service Chief Bosworth transferred him from California to Montana.

  • An energy plan as solid as natural gas

    President Bush's much-heralded energy plan is extremely vague, but its vagueness may be the document's strong point, the writer opines.

  • Bush administration blinks on roadless rule

    Republican attacks on the national forest roadless rule, although supported by a federal judge, still may backfire in a country that shows ever-increasing environmental concern.

  • An environmentalist in the heart of cowboy culture

    Former Interior Secretary Stewart Udall, Arizona native, rancher and environmentalist, lectures on cooperation and community in the West at the Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nev., and gets a surprising ovation.

  • The tale of a salmon slinger

    On a tributary of Oregon's Nehalem River, the writer worked with Fish and Wildlife biologist Michele Long to scatter the carcasses of hatchery salmon, which feed a wide range of wildlife.

  • The environmental movement is a-muddle

    Conservation organizations and activists are suddenly feeling lost and lonely in Washington, D.C., in the new, anti-environmental world of George W. Bush and friends.

  • Yellowstone's last stampede

    A visit to Yellowstone in winter leads to encounters with park employees eager for (and snowmobilers vehemently against) the coming banishment of snowmobiles from the national park.

  • Weirdness abounds in Washington

    His choices of Gale Norton for Interior Secretary and John Ashcroft for Attorney General show that George W. Bush has already abandoned bipartisanship.

  • A 'most improbable scenerio' has come to pass

    HCN's political columnist considers the recent, weird and not-quite-finished election, and suggests that if George Bush turns out to be the winner, he will have to govern from the middle, which could prove good news for the environment.

  • CARA's not quite the girl she used to be

    Despite its tremendous original support, CARA (the Conservation and Resource Act of 1999) has come through Congress much changed and reduced.

  • In presidential politics, the West has a bad hand

    A longtime political observer explains how it is that a huge region like the West has a rather minimal influence on national presidential elections.

  • The latest salmon plan heads toward a train wreck

    The long-awaited federal plan for saving the Northwest's endangered salmon avoids the question of breaching dams and satisfies almost no one.

  • Can 'property rightsniks' stop a popular bill?

    The Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 2000, which would guarantee permanent funding for 15 years for buying land for conservation, has broad support but still faces an interesting dance through a complicated Congress.

  • Yes, we need the rural West

    The rural West is still important and is central to the struggle to restore the landscape and wildlife of the region.

  • Do we really need the rural West?

    A Las Vegas historian argues that the rural West is nothing but an anachronism that means nothing in today's New West.