Perspective

  • While America waits for war, the environment suffers

    In these duct-tape, Code Orange days, only a small political elite seems to be keeping an eye on the environment.

  • Bush's energy push meets unintended consequences

    The Bush administrations' push to drill and drill yet more in the West is likely to have surprising consequences, arousing even some Republicans to protest.

  • Presidential hopeful plays with fire

    Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., is in hot water over his attempt to appeal-proof a controversial thinning project in his home state, but the situation is more complicated than his gleeful Republican opponents admit.

  • Congress goes barmy over the Army

    Congress spends little time examining military requests before giving the OK, even when it comes to training in areas that affect wildlife or destroy ecosystems.

  • New monuments: Planning by numbers

    The Interior Department's decision to go ahead and manage the new monuments established by Clinton raises cautious optimism among the environmental fraternity - the caution due to Norton's emphasis on local involvement: miners, grazers and motorheads, for

  • Campaign finance reform may boost grass roots

    The campaign finance reform bill sponsored by John McCain and Russell Feingold won't solve everything, but it may give grassroots environmental groups a bit of an edge in future political battles.

  • Yucca Mountain debate goes nuclear

    The battle over storing nuclear waste at Nevada's Yucca Mountain is heating up in Congress as well as in Nevada and the West.

  • The Arctic: A slave to luck

    In ordinary times, Interior Secretary Gale Norton's lack of honesty about the impact of oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would make headlines.

  • A murder mystery on Whiskey Mountain

    A mysterious disease is killing off the bighorn sheep on Montana's Whiskey Mountain, and biologist John Mioncynski is working to track down the culprit.

  • New forest chief becomes a lame duck

    Soon after regional forester Brad Powell signed the revolutionary, controversial Sierra Nevada Framework, Forest Service Chief Bosworth transferred him from California to Montana.

  • An energy plan as solid as natural gas

    President Bush's much-heralded energy plan is extremely vague, but its vagueness may be the document's strong point, the writer opines.

  • Bush administration blinks on roadless rule

    Republican attacks on the national forest roadless rule, although supported by a federal judge, still may backfire in a country that shows ever-increasing environmental concern.

  • An environmentalist in the heart of cowboy culture

    Former Interior Secretary Stewart Udall, Arizona native, rancher and environmentalist, lectures on cooperation and community in the West at the Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nev., and gets a surprising ovation.

  • The tale of a salmon slinger

    On a tributary of Oregon's Nehalem River, the writer worked with Fish and Wildlife biologist Michele Long to scatter the carcasses of hatchery salmon, which feed a wide range of wildlife.

  • The environmental movement is a-muddle

    Conservation organizations and activists are suddenly feeling lost and lonely in Washington, D.C., in the new, anti-environmental world of George W. Bush and friends.