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Energy

  • Book Reviews

    Take a walk

    Katie Alvord's book, Divorce Your Car! Ending the love affair with the automobile, offers reason, advice and good humor about reducing automobile use.

  • Book Reviews

    Efficient energy is efficient business

    Washington State University's Cooperative Extension Energy Program has an Energy Ideas Clearinghouse Web site, offering many ways to conserve power.

  • News

    Greens are still seeing red

    Environmentalists say Wyoming's Red Desert is in danger, facing the prospect of 10,000-15,000 oil and gas wells by 2010.

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    Under pressure, Montana opts for a slower approach

    Near Miles City, Montana, landowners are fighting to slow down methane gas development.

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    'There is a light at the end of the tunnel'

    Byron Oedekoven, who ranches near Gillette, Wyo., in his own words, offers advice for landowners who have to work with gas companies.

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    'The industry's philosophy has been to fragment thecommunity'

    Wyoming Rancher Mike Foate has developed a Web site to spread information about the gas industry to his often isolated, intimidated neighbors.

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    'We became Michiwest's sewer'

    Ranchers Earl and Sue Boardman have a hard time working with Michiwest, the Michigan-based company that owns the gas wells on their land. Earl, in his own words.

  • Feature

    Open for business: Wyoming throws away its water to getout the gas

    Under Gov. Jim Geringer's "open for business' philosophy, the methane gas industry faces little regulation in Wyoming.

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    'The playing field has to be leveled'

    Rancher and developer Charles Micale says the gas industry should respect the property rights of surface owners.

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    'It's hard to keep fighting'

    Janey Hines, in her own words, talks about battling the gas industry with the Grand Valley Citizens Alliance, the group she heads in Parachute, Colo.

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    Status quo reigns in New Mexico

    In New Mexico, some say complaints about oil and gas development are dwarfed by the industry's clout.

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    'It's corporate greed'

    Arnold Mackley, whose western Colorado ranch is dotted with gas wells in his own words says the industry ought to able to make a living without destroying the land.

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    'We need that gas'

    Ken Wonstolen of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, in his own words, says that Colorado is an energy-dependent state, and the methane gas it produces is greatly needed.

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    How well do you know your wells?

    A primer describes the technology and potential problems of methane-gas drilling.

  • Feature

    Colliding forces: Has Colorado's oil and gas industry met its match?

    In Colorado, homeowners and developers are battling the oil and gas industry as the boom in methane gas production brings increased numbers of wells to the rural landscape.

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