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Climate & Pollution

  • News

    Shifting sands in Navajoland

    On the drought-stricken Navajo Nation, scientist Margaret Hiza Redsteer studies the movement of sand dunes.

  • News

    Climate cash-in

    Western farmers and ranchers using progressive land-management techniques can make a few bucks from the new carbon market – but some critics say it won’t lead to any real reduction in carbon emissions.

  • News

    The West’s wacky weather

    The West’s weather is full of surprises this spring, with snowstorms, windstorms, rain and wildfires all happening at the same time.

  • Essays

    The mysticism of mud

    Ernest Atencio ponders an exceptionally muddy Mud Season in New Mexico, and notes how readily most Westerners forget that we live in an arid landscape.

  • News

    Climate Revolutionary

    Law professor Mary C. Wood wants to use “atmospheric trust litigation” to tackle global warming in the courts.

  • News

    Up in FLAME

    Proposed bill calls for separate "catastrophic wildfire" fund

  • Essays

    A hard winter makes you think

    Rhonda Claridge describes a hard winter in the high mountains and points out that one seldom-acknowledged effect of climate change could be harder winters in some parts of the world.

  • Writers on the Range

    A hard winter makes you think

    Rhonda Claridge describes a hard winter in the high mountains, and points out that one seldom-acknowledged effect of climate change could be harder winters in some parts of the world.

  • Two Weeks in the West

    Two weeks in the West

    Nasty chemicals in the Western air; drilling dust; EPA gets tougher on mercury; wildlife agency reconsiders habitat for Canada lynx and protection for sage grouse and white-tailed prairie dogs; and Grand Canyon gets a man-made flood.

  • Feature

    Unnatural Preservation

    Public-land managers in the era of global warming face uncomfortable choices: Do they intervene to protect dying plants and animals, or stand back and let this new version of “nature” take its course?

  • Editor's Note

    Planning for uncertainty

    A Phoenix symposium on dealing with drought and global warming echoes the larger uncertainties facing public-land and national park managers throughout the West.

  • Writers on the Range

    You can’t stop nature

    Pepper Trail warns us that we continue to tinker with nature at our peril.

  • News

    Toxic legacy

    Some activists fear that toxic chemicals in a New Mexico landfill, left over from Cold War-era nuclear weapons research, may be creeping toward the Albuquerque Aquifer.

  • News

    Coal’s other mess

    Even as the air over power plants clears, the coal combustion waste on the ground gets worse – and the EPA seems disinclined to deal with the problem.

  • News

    Ashes to houses

    One of coal's big messes is transformed into building blocks

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