Items by Julianne Couch

Floyd Dominy, the colossus of dams, dies at 100
Floyd Dominy, the colossus of dams, dies at 100
An interview with the former Bureau of Reclamation commissioner, who built Glen Canyon dam
The names of things and why they matter
Westerners like knowing the names of local wildflowers, but Julianne Couch says it’s equally important to identify manmade objects in the landscape.
In Wyoming, caucusing gets personal
Julianne Couch was excited by Wyoming’s Democratic caucus, feeling that for once it really mattered.
The day the view died
Julianne Couch regrets that Laramie has now grown so much she can no longer recognize the familiar view she once loved to see as she drove into town.
Nothing out there can be a very good thing
Julianne Couch surveys the vastness of Wyoming’s Adobe Town badlands and hopes that oil and gas drilling does not invade its beautiful emptiness.
Nothing out there can be a very good thing
Julianne Couch surveys the vastness of Wyoming's Adobe Town badlands and hopes that oil and gas drilling does not invade its beautiful emptiness.
Ducks on the walls
Julianne Couch would rather have real antlers on the walls than a silkscreened trout adorning a sweatshirt.
Flying with Cowgirls all over Wyoming
Julianne Couch says the University of Wyoming women’s basketball team had the whole state cheering as they became national champions.
Notes from a place of risk and hope
In Big Wonderful: Notes from Wyoming, Kevin Holdsworth describes his love for a harsh landscape in essays, poetry and fiction.
We bought an SUV, and we're proud of it
The writer buys an SUV because it does the job she needs it to do. So there.
Our lungs, ourselves: Smoking in Wyoming bars
The writer doesn't want a smoking ban affecting the homey bars that dot rural and remote Wyoming
Waypoints of the heart
The writer loves geocache hunts — and wishes everything in life were that simple
Waypoints of the heart
The new hobby of geocaching gives the author and her husband an excuse to explore Wyoming with a GPS while seeking to decode small human mysteries