Items by Jon Waldman

When nature calls, don't follow your instincts
For environmental as well as aesthetic reasons, parks like Grand Teton in Wyoming are doing away with wilderness outhouses, and requesting hikers to use "poop bags" to pack out human waste.
The sod squad wants to soak you
In the drought-stricken West, water cops, singing governors and giant walking raindrops are just some of the odd measures spawned by water-conservation campaigns.
Shrinking water supply makes room for birds
At Roosevelt Lake in Arizona, endangered southwestern willow flycatchers are actually thriving as the water level drops and willow and tamarisk take over.
Bikers waffle on wilderness
In California, the International Mountain Bicycling Association is leery of a new proposal to designate two and half million acres of wilderness in the state.
Mi rio, mi agua
Tension is rising between Mexico and the U.S. over the little water left in the drought-stricken Rio Grande.
Utah gases up
Veritas DGC Inc. has released a draft EIS proposing oil and gas exploration in Utah's Book Cliffs.
Lewis and Clark revisited
The Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition plans to commemorate the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition with a get-together examining the connections between the explorers, Native Americans and salmon.
It's the dog days for prairie dogs
Conservation groups petition to list the white-tailed prairie dog as endangered, but the species is unlikely to be listed because the agency is laready backlogged.
N.D. court ruling rescinds tribal authority
North Dakota farmer Roger Shea hoped to prevent a dam on the Maple River by giving the Chippewa Indians title to his land, but the state Supreme Court rules that the state may condemn tribal land.
Prescribed burns tame the beast
Fighting fire with fire is becoming more common in the West, as the Forest Service uses prescribed burns to tackle wildfires.
A wide-angled wilderness
The proposed Wild Sky Wilderness Area northeast of Seattle could be a model for future wilderness designations, based on its diversity of tourism-based opportunities along with good environmental stewardship.
Growth boundary grows
The growth boundary to limit sprawl on Colorado's Front Range, originated five years ago by concerned business leaders, developers and government officials, has been revised periodically to accommodate more growth, which critics say defeats the purpose.
Interior's conflicting interests
Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles is accused by environmentalists of conflict of interest in his encouragement of coalbed-methane drilling in the Powder River Basin.
Expatriate fish could return a hero
The Hofer rainbow trout, a foreign offspring of the Pacific rainbow, may be the answer to the cure for whirling disease, but wildlife managers are concerned about introducing the imported species, fearing it could displace native fish.
We'd like 2,387 salmon and a Pepsi, please
A report from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests exact numbers of wild salmon and steelhead needed in each tributary of the Columbia for removal from the endangered species list.