Items by Jaime O'Neill

The burden of being different
The burden of being different
Water and waste are an old story
Water and waste are an old story
This resource in the American West will always be dammed, diverted or otherwise purloined.
Words to live by as the year winds down
Words to live by as the year winds down
Adages, quotes and sayings to inspire in 2014.
Thoughts on Presidents’ Day
Thoughts on Presidents’ Day
The author reflects on the courage of Abe Lincoln and James Garfield.
Giving names to smoke and fire
Giving names to smoke and fire
Why do we name fires?
Feeding the deer
Feeding the deer
A rural Californian doesn't apologize for feeding the deer that hang out near his mountain home.
Times are tough all over
Times are tough all over
Where's the compassion for the poor bullied 1 percent of the world -- the rich people who just aren't as rich as they ought to be?
Oil in the swimming pool
Oil in the swimming pool
The BP oil spill exemplifies the worst kind of corporate arrogance.
And you think times are tough
And you think times are tough
The articles in old American Heritage magazines remind one that life in the West used to be much harder than it is.
And you think times are tough
And you think times are tough
The articles in old American Heritage magazines remind us that life in the West used to be a whole lot harder than it is.
The very worst thing about hard times
The very worst thing about hard times
Too often, Americans feel personally guilty when they’re poor and out of work, even when outside forces are responsible.
Putting our house back in order
Jaime O’Neill hadn’t planned on vacuuming during Inauguration Day, but housecleaning is a good metaphor for the job facing our new president.
You better watch out, that's for sure
Jaime O'Neill takes a sardonic look at the psychology behind Christmas carols like "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer."
A field guide to the instant rural guy
Jaime O’Neill knows how to spot an instant rural guy — aka a flatlander
Our Green Mountain
A writer recalls the adventures he had had in Quincy, Calif., 20 years ago, when he was the youthful editor of a small-town independent paper called the Green Mountain Gazette