Items by Diane Sylvain

Consider the names this July 4th
Consider the names this July 4th
Following Dad down the road
Following Dad down the road
The author reminisces on an itinerant childhood and her family's travels up, down and across the country -- and how she now clings firmly to one place called home.
The light is changing... summer is ending
The light is changing... summer is ending
Suddenly summer is almost over, and autumn is almost beginning.
The trouble with guns
The trouble with guns
Maybe it's true that guns don't kill people, but people using guns can sure do damage.
Poetry in motion
Poetry in motion
That odd-looking woman on the sidewalk ahead of you is not just talking to herself; she's trying -- loudly -- to memorize a poem.
I think we're all anchor babies on this bus
I think we're all anchor babies on this bus
If we're no longer considered U.S. citizens by birthright, then how do we know we're citizens at all?
Welcome, new interns!
Welcome, new interns!
High Country News welcomes three new interns and several visitors and wins a couple of important prizes.
Visitors from underground
Visitors from underground
Spelunkers visit High Country News; correction; obituaries for N.W. Grosse-Rhode and Ramon Mena Owens.
Essay: Surviving a friend's suicide
We are sewn into each other’s lives like pieces in a quilt
The memory of a mountain
Diane Sylvain remembers climbing Pikes Peak with her mother, back when her mother still knew what a mountain was.
The memory of mountains
The author remembers a long-ago hike up Pikes Pike with her mother, who later died having no memory of that hike, or of her daughter.
Seeing the mysterious in the everyday
An artist writes about learning to love the less-dramatic landscapes of the West
The canyon between us
A visit to the strange landscape of Utah’s Goosenecks of the San Juan reveals the chasm growing between two people.
Coyote vigils
A Catholic environmentalist considers coyotes and the Creator during a retreat at a Trappist Monastery in the mountains.
A harsh and priceless gift to the world
The author says the Escalante belongs as much to the rest of the world as to Utah, and provides a kind of energy that has nothing to do with coal.
Heard Around the West
Nevada pigeon poop, an empty Arches National Park, impersonating game wardens, Ben Campbell upset by female impersonator, militia forms PAC, Helen Chenoweth on grizzly bear recovery, hunting escaped cows, DIA's traffic control woes.