Items by Andrew Gulliford

Remembering a feathered river across the sky
Remembering a feathered river across the sky
You can still get your kicks on Route 66
You can still get your kicks on Route 66
Houseboaters vs. river runners
Houseboaters vs. river runners
Two writers debate the cultural differences of fast-water paddlers and still-water luxury boaters.
Recapture Canyon and an illegal ATV trail
Recapture Canyon and an illegal ATV trail
A Utah county attempts to gain right of way on public land.
Who speaks for the sage grouse?
Who speaks for the sage grouse?
Let's step back from the rhetoric and handwringing and take the long view.
We need younger hunters
We need younger hunters
Without new hunters to carry on conservation traditions, wild game and habitat will suffer.
A roadside shrine, a beacon of faith
A roadside shrine, a beacon of faith
Seeking out a roadside shrine that touched this writer decades ago.
National parks see suicide upticks each summer
National parks see suicide upticks each summer
Rangers handle these tragedies, the parks' second leading cause of death.
My public land pup
My public land pup
Hiking on the West's public lands is better with a canine companion
Wild horses: Too much of a good thing
Wild horses: Too much of a good thing
Wild horses wreak environmental havoc. What kind of symbol is this for the American West?
Never underestimate the power of prejudice
Never underestimate the power of prejudice
Prejudice 100 years ago delayed the admission of New Mexico and Arizona to the union.
How, 150 years ago, the Homestead Act transformed the West
How, 150 years ago, the Homestead Act transformed the West
Jefferson's dream changed the landscape and settled this region.
Black Sunday, 30 years later
Black Sunday, 30 years later
The author attends a peculiar reunion, a meeting with the former Exxon executives who pulled the plug on oil shale three decades ago.
Life among the Bluffoons
Life among the Bluffoons
There may be only 200 people living in Bluff, Utah, today, but they cherish a history that goes back for centuries, along with the dramatic red-rock
How to find a 13,000 year-old mammoth
How to find a 13,000 year-old mammoth
After seeing a drawing of a wooly mammoth in a Utah cave, the author ponders on the possibility they existed along with the humans who inhabited the U.S. Southwest years ago.
A prodigal son is honored by his hometown
A prodigal son is honored by his hometown
Controversial writer Dalton Trumbo returns to his hometown of Grand Junction, Colo. -- in a bronze bathtub.
Slobs at Lake Powell foment a revolt
Slobs at Lake Powell foment a revolt
Rather than rail against Lake Powell's mere existence, conservationists should try to restore and protect the landscape that is still there.
Up in the air, a living memorial
Up in the air, a living memorial
California condors are back, and they're more impressive than manmade marvels.
Black Sunday won't ever happen again
Black Sunday won't ever happen again
Twenty-eight years ago, the oil shale industry abruptly pulled out of western Colorado, leaving the local economy in shambles and teaching a painful lesson.
Great Old Broads celebrate 20 years of hiking and advocacy
Great Old Broads celebrate 20 years of hiking and advocacy
Describing themselves as "the junkyard dogs of the environmental movement," the women of Great Old Broads for Wilderness have spent 20 looking out for the wild lands they love.
How one "girl ranger" helped save the Southwest
How one "girl ranger" helped save the Southwest
Lynell Schalk broke through the BLM’s “sagebrush ceiling” in the 1960s to become the first female special agent in the Western U.S. authorized to carry a gun.
Winter camping can be hazardous to your health
Winter camping can be hazardous to your health
One hundred and thirty-five years ago, Alferd E. Packer survived winter starvation in the Colorado mountains with the help of his friends -- or at least of the meat on their bones.
Conscientious objectors 65 years ago
Conscientious objectors 65 years ago
Paying homage to those imprisoned at Mancos Camp, Colo., during World War II.
All Westerners are stalwart (and other tall tales)
Andrew Gulliford gets a kick out of the humor of the West, with its emphasis on boosterism, exaggeration and outright, extravagant lying.
Lake Powell’s sandstone walls speak after 232 years
Andrew Gulliford describes how a graffiti-removal team near Lake Powell discovered a message left long ago by Spanish friars.
Condors – the best air show in the West
Andrew Gulliford applauds the aerial acrobatics of the Colorado Plateau’s newly returned condors.
Hard lessons from Colorado’s concentration camp
Andrew Gulliford tells the painful story of Colorado’s Camp Amache, where 14,000 Japanese Americans were imprisoned during World War II.
Life and breath in the West
Andrew Gulliford says his brother, who is dying of emphysema, bought the Marlboro-man myth that smoking is a Western thing.
Where’s Teddy when you need him?
The writer wishes Theodore Roosevelt could return and give the Republican party – and the rest of us – a good talking-to about conservation today
Tourist tales from the New West
Guiding tours in the West for the ultra-rich can be more than a little surreal