Items by Paul Larmer

Still evolving 40 years later
Still evolving 40 years later
High Country News continues to evolve along with the conservation movement itself, especially in the thorny area of environmental justice.
Native power in Tucson
Native power in Tucson
HCN sponsors a conference on energy development and environmental activism on the Hopi and Navajo reservations; visitors; planning; corrections.
How big is your backyard?
How big is your backyard?
We all become NIMBYs when development threatens our favorite landscapes – even conservative oilmen like Wyoming’s Diemer True.
Changing of the guard
Longtime HCN board members Dan Luecke and Felix Magowan step down; bat-chasers and bicyclists; and correction.
How big should we be?
The September board meeting raised questions about how big HCN should be; artists and activists visit us.
Power politics, conservation style
Power politics, conservation style
In this issue, Ray Ring takes a hard look at the behind-the-scenes politicking that helped create Clinton’s roadless forest rule.
An ecological dilemma
An ecological dilemma
When the cat swallows the bird, and the owl swallows the cat, what's a guy supposed to do?
Rodeo remains a Western spark
Rodeo remains a Western spark
In the 21st century, rodeo is still thriving – especially in the turbocharged form of the Professional Bull Riding circuit.
Semi-wild in the new West
Semi-wild in the new West
Semi-wild rural landscapes, where humans mingle with wildlife, are a richer source of biodiversity than many Westerners realize.
Dwindling supplies inflame water wars
Dwindling supplies inflame water wars
Arguing about water is a beloved Western pastime, but Coloradoans may soon find themselves seriously fighting over what’s left in the Colorado River.
HCN board meeting – in cyberspace
High Country News holds its first-ever board meeting via telephone and Internet; Marty Durlin becomes new culture editor.
Welcome to the era of scarcity
Welcome to the era of scarcity
Arguing about water is a beloved Western pastime, but as the snowpack shrinks, Coloradoans are going to find themselves seriously fighting over what’s left in the Colorado River.
The terror and beauty of away games
The terror and beauty of away games
In small Western towns, schoolkids – and their parents – often make long journeys over rugged mountain roads just to play other high school sports teams.
The HCN miracle
The HCN miracle
HCN’s readers pitch in financially; new interns Terray Sylvester, Emily Underwood and Jeff Chen arrive.
Of an environmental hero and the need for reform
Paul Larmer reminds us that it will take more than a single environmental hero – like Tim DeChristopher, who cleverly sabotaged a BLM energy-lease auction – to reform the agency.
Time to reform and repair
Paul Larmer reminds us that it will take more than a single environmental hero – like Tim DeChristopher, who cleverly sabotaged a BLM energy-lease auction – to reform the agency.
Heeding history’s lessons
There are lessons to be learned from the mistakes that were made, not only in the near-extermination of the wolf, but also in its successful reintroduction.
A photographic life
Photographer Grant Heilman talks about his life and work in the West.
Evolution of a magazine
Today’s redesigned High Country News is definitely a magazine, far removed from the black-and-white tabloid newspaper it once was.
Knee high by the Fourth of July
Growing corn in the interior West ain't no picnic.
Cowboy up to the energy boom
In today’s complicated West, where retirees battle energy companies and environmentalists fight transmission lines carrying green power, maybe we need some heroic cowboys to help straighten everything out.
Primer 5: Wildlife
How far are we willing to go to accommodate wild creatures?
The hazards of the leasing game
Protecting environmentally sensitive Western lands from the current oil and gas frenzy is a challenge to the conservationists who file protests with the BLM.
Primer 2: Energy
The West's abundant resources below ground have supplied much of the power for the U.S. in the past; are renewables next?
Don’t write off this story yet
The Salton Sea might appear to be dying, but like many another story in the West, it isn’t over with yet.
Planning for uncertainty
A Phoenix symposium on dealing with drought and global warming echoes the larger uncertainties facing public-land and national park managers throughout the West.
The Sagebrush Rebels ride again -- and again
Despite the rhetoric of the Sagebrush Rebel lawyers, most of today’s Westerners understand that the public land is a national resource that belongs to all of us.
Becoming a native
In a West made up of newcomers, it’s hard to tell who really counts as a native – even when it comes to exotic plants such as the infamous tamarisk.
Dear friends
Editor John Mecklin to step down, Jonathan Thompson to step up; visitors; clarification on Rebecca Solnit interview.
Loosening the grazing knot
A showdown in Idaho pits bighorn sheep lovers against longtime sheep ranchers, but if people are willing to work together, this grazing knot can be untied.