Items by Joshua Zaffos

Wilderness proposal or political ploy?
Environmentalists say the Red Table Mountain Wilderness proposal of Rep. Scott McInnis, R-Colo., is so full of anti-wilderness provisions that it is nothing but a political ploy.
Refuge back in the crosshairs
Republican control of the new Congress may resurrect plans for oil and gas drilling in Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife National Refuge and the National Petroleum Reserve.
How to go with the flow
Montana Audubon has written an eight-page guide to flood preparation, called Go With the Flow: Streams and Bank Stabilization.
Catch 22
A plan to restore native pikeminnow and sucker to the San Juan River in New Mexico may end up destroying a world-class trout fishery.
Fish and wildlife have rights, too
Montana’s Supreme Court rules that citizens and government agencies can maintain water rights without "using" the water, while the Wyoming Legislature stalls over a bill that would allow irrigators to leave water instream temporarily.
Klamath water worth more in river
A U.S. Geological Survey study, suppressed by the Interior Department in October, says that recreation adds more than agriculture to the economy of the Klamath River Basin.
A slap of Western reality
In his memoir of rural life in Alder Creek, Idaho, On All Sides Nowhere, author William Gruber avoids the traps of sentimentality and self-importance that so often infest the genre
Reports drill Bush energy plan
The Wilderness Society has published two reports criticizing the Bush administration's national energy plan
Did the BLM Spike New Mexico's ditches?
Herbicide spread by BLM land managers on range near Malaga, N.M., has washed into the Black River, contaminating a diversion ditch and killing nearby farmers' crops and trees
Clinton-era monuments weather court challenge
A federal court rules that Pres. Clinton did, in fact, have the authority to create six national monuments in four Western states
My trysts with Miss November
November out West: The spectacle of changing leaves has passed, the hills collecting snow are not yet blanketed in white, and daylight savings brings night time all too soon. It may sound innocent, but the season feels like a cruel and careless mistress t
Golden trout swimming in troubled waters
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering whether to list the disappearing golden trout, California's state fish, as endangered.
Corps stands behind status quo
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says that, because of drought, changing the management of the Missouri River and its dams to benefit endangered fish and birds must be postponed.
Navajos can't Dine at local diner
RD's Drive-In in Page, Ariz., is facing a federal lawsuit over its policy of not allowing Navajo employees to speak their native language while at work.
Washington citizens fight to save aging Hanford reactor
In Hanford, Wash., a local group, the Citizens for Medical Isotopes, wants to convert the Fast Flux Test Facility into a private facility producing medical isotopes.
Have you ever seen the cranes?
In New Mexico, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge celebrates its annual Festival of the Cranes in November.
Research, Lake Mead style
A floating laboratory called Forever Earth prowls Nevada's Lake Mead, doing scientific research and working with academic and environmental groups.
Peer pressure
The Web site of PEER - Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility - features a report on increasing violence against National Park Service employees, along with other topics.
A flood of admirers
In the anthology The River We Carry With Us, writers and poets celebrate the enduring beauty of Montana's Clark Fork River and grapple with the environmental problems facing it.
BLM gets a land-swap lemon
The BLM says a congressionally mandated land swap will trade public land on the Utah-Colorado border for Moffatt County, Colo., acreage that has not been identified as necessary or desirable.