You are here: home

Did you not find what you were looking for? Try the Advanced Search to refine your search.

24 items matching your search terms. Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
  • Monument status could wreck ruins

    Archaeologists fear that without more funds to manage tourism, the ruins in newly designated Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, Colo., will suffer from increased visitors.

  • Entrepreneur shovels trouble

    Archaeologists are appalled at Anasazi Digs, a family-owned business near Monticello, Utah, that plans to sell the right to dig and keep artifacts from prehistoric ruins on private land.

  • Nine reasons why a river is good for the soul

    A writer on a river trip through canyon country muses on things like sand, rapids, ruins and time, as well as the joy that comes from being outside in the company of family and friends

  • Dry-hiking in a desert awash with history

    A 61-year-old hiker and two middle-aged friends take an epic hike through Arizona in David Roberts’ new book, Sandstone Spine

  • Destruction and discovery walk hand in hand

    A new plan to steer energy development away from cultural sites in New Mexico could streamline energy development, fund archaeological research and preserve ancient sites all at once

  • Driven to fight

    Retired BLM agent Lynell Schalk goes head-to-head with her former bosses over protecting southern Utah’s priceless archaeological sites from off-road vehicle traffic.

  • Phoenix Falling?

    Craig Childs lifts the rug of modern-day Phoenix, Ariz., to examine the remnants of the civilization that preceded it – the Hohokam people, who also built a great city in the middle of the desert, and flourished until the day they ran out of water.

  • A lesson from the old ones at Mesa Verde

    The writer walks where the Mesa Verde cliff dwellers walked, and wonders why they fled

  • A Utah rancher’s secret was a gift to us

    The writer praises a Utah man for keeping an ancient Native American village safe from vandals for half a century

  • The Pictograph Murders

    The Pictograph Murders by P.G. Karamesines, combines archaeology, witchcraft and murder in a chilling first novel set in Utah

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. Why I am a Tea Party member |
  3. The privatization of public campground management | All the info you need to decide whether you love o...
  4. Efficiency lessons from Germany |
  5. The Latest: Interior commits to restoring bison on select lands | The “odd ungulate out” gets a tentative win.
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  3. What's killing the Yukon's salmon? | An ecological mystery in Alaska has scientists and...
  4. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
  5. North Dakota wrestles with radioactive oilfield waste | Regulators look at raising the limit for radiation...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone