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  • Are we smart enough to solve our raven problem?

    Are we smart enough to solve our raven problem?

    As ravens spread, they’re finding friends and foes in Western states. Subscribers only

  • Can cows and grouse coexist on the range?

    Colorado rancher Brad Phelps believes that cattle and sage grouse can live together, but biologists, environmentalists and other ranchers continue to argue over exactly what impact grazing has.

  • Chick-a-boom-boom at the lek

    Male sage grouse gather at leks to dance in front of females in elaborate mating displays.

  • Last dance for the sage grouse?

    Across the Interior West, as the sagebrush sea recedes under the environmental stress of human impacts, its emblematic bird, the sage grouse, is also in decline, and no one seems to know what to do about it.

  • Snowy plover predators become prey

    On the coast of Oregon, federal agencies have decided to start poisoning and killing the predators that steal the eggs of endangered snowy plovers.

  • Golfers may oust eagles

    The plan for a golf course and housing development on the Snake River near Jackson Hole, Wyo., would allow the developer to displace or kill up to 18 bald eagles.

  • Owl things considered

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated 4.6 billion acres in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah as critical habitat for the Mexican spotted owl, but the Center for Biological Diversity says that is not enough and plans to sue.

  • Condor program laden with lead

    Endangered condors reintroduced in the West are dying, many from lead poisoning caused by the bullets in the carcasses they feed on.

  • Evicted terns get new habitat

    In an effort to help endangered salmon on the Columbia River, Caspian terns that prey on the fish are being lured to different habitat.

  • Raptors won't fry away

    A new agreement by the Fish and Wildlife Service and Minneapolis Xcel Energy could set a precedent for protecting more raptors from electrocution on power lines.

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