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  • Budget cuts bury paleontologists

    The new superintendent of Dinosaur National Monument in Jensen, Utah, plans to cut nine positions in the paleontology department and hand over future scientific work to private contractors, much to the outrage of the scientific community.

  • Dinosaur tracks on a desert shore

    When drought shrank Lake Powell this summer, paleontologist Martin Lockley went to work scouring the shoreline for newly revealed rare dinosaur tracks in the sandstone

  • Dinosaur bones and dastardly deeds

    Douglas Preston’s fast-moving thriller Tyrannosaur Canyon is perfect summer escape reading for anyone who loves adventure, intrigue and romance – especially served up with dinosaur fossils

  • Tripping over T-Rex

    Paleontologist Bob Harmon loves nothing better than digging for old bones under the hot Montana sun

  • Back to the future

    A long time ago, the earth warmed considerably; now, scientists study fossils to find out what happened – and what it might mean for us today.

  • Everyday objects and extraordinary journeys

    In Visible Bones: Journeys Across Time in the Columbia River Country, Northwestern writer Jack Nisbet follows the Columbia River and its inhabitants across time

  • The Natural West

    Dan Flores' book, "The Natural West: Environmental History in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains," points out that North America's ancient past is littered with destroyed species.

  • One big bighorn

    The National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center in Dubois, Wyo., will display the skull of the biggest bighorn ever known, a 15,000- to 22,000-year-old relic.

  • They left only footprints

    In Wyoming's Bighorn Basin, a flood reveals more than 2,000 dinosaur tracks in a gully.

  • Wyoming Dinosaur Center

    The Wyoming Dinosaur Center southeast of Yellowstone National Park offers kids aged 8-13 a chance to assist scientists in digging dinosaur bones.

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