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  • The little wilderness that could

    The long and carefully planned campaign to protect the Ojito Wilderness in New Mexico holds useful lessons for wilderness activists across the West

  • Bikers waffle on wilderness

    In California, the International Mountain Bicycling Association is leery of a new proposal to designate two and half million acres of wilderness in the state.

  • Democrats and Republicans can work together

    Democrats and Republicans can work together

    Bipartisan politics briefly returned to Washington, D.C., with the passage of the Omnibus Public Land Management Act.

  • Water across the Divide

    Water across the Divide

    In 2003, Colorado's Grand Ditch was breached, causing flood damage to the Upper Colorado River and to Rocky Mountain National Park.

  • Wilderness by committee

    Wilderness by committee

    Complicated deals are being made over wilderness protection in Colorado and in San Juan County, Utah.

  • The great wilderness compromise

    Both sides of the contentious debate over a proposed Idaho wilderness bill invoke Howard Zahniser, father of the Wilderness Act -- and both sides have a point.

  • Conservationist in a Conservative Land

    Rick Johnson of the Idaho Conservation League is working with Republican Congressman Mike Simpson on a wilderness bill for the Boulder and White Cloud mountains, but not everybody in "Planet Idaho" is happy

  • A wilderness bill with a little something for everyone

    The Boulder-White Clouds wilderness bill tries to give something to everybody, as a list of some of its provisions reveals

  • Oklahoma vs. the West

    Oklahoma vs. the West

    Oklahoma Republican Sens. Tom Coburn and Jim Inhofe have a way of riding roughshod over the West's environmental politics.

  • Wilderness and military use can coexist

    Wilderness and military use can coexist

    The U.S. Army has no reason to oppose the proposed Red Table Mountain wilderness in Colorado, because its helicopter training flights could easily be grandfathered in.

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