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  • What lies beneath

    What lies beneath

    When pesticide chemicals were found underneath the houses of Barber Orchard, N.C., it aroused fears nationwide about the risks of building on former agricultural land.

  • Backyard poisons?

    Backyard poisons?

    Soil samples from the yards of two Yakima families showed intriguing but not always comforting results.

  • New Mexico’s groundwater protections may take a hit

    New Mexico’s groundwater protections may take a hit

    Under Gov. Susana Martinez, the state is rolling back some of its strongest environmental protections.

  • Toxic legacy

    Some activists fear that toxic chemicals in a New Mexico landfill, left over from Cold War-era nuclear weapons research, may be creeping toward the Albuquerque Aquifer.

  • Farming's Toxic Legacy

    Farming's Toxic Legacy

    Long-banned pesticides linger in the soils of neighborhoods built on former agricultural land in central Washington.

  • A loophole you can squeeze a feedlot through

    In dry eastern Washington, small farmers resent a corporate feedlot’s access to scarce water supplies.

  • Colorado River states reach landmark agreement

    The seven states of the Colorado River Basin have come to a groundbreaking agreement that, among other things, will allow cities such as Las Vegas to lease water from out-of-state farms during times of drought

  • Drought forces a new era of agricultural water conservation

    Drought forces a new era of agricultural water conservation

    Whether converting open ditches into pipelines or fallowing fields, farmers and ranchers in the West are being forced to change the ways they use water as climate-induced drought tightens its grip.

  • The BLM fights for the Southwest’s last free-flowing river

    The BLM fights for the Southwest’s last free-flowing river

    A federal agency asserts its water rights to the San Pedro river in a case that might eventually lead to limits on growth in Arizona.

  • Farmers agree to tax those who deplete groundwater

    Farmers agree to tax those who deplete groundwater

    Amid drought and climate change in Colorado’s San Luis Valley, farmers vote for a new approach to rein in their overpumping of groundwater.

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