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  • Yellowstone fires still ignite controversy

    In Scorched Earth, journalist Rocky Barker describes firsthand the chaos and consequences of the Yellowstone fires

  • Montana gets a taste of old-time logging

    Critics say a massive salvage-logging operation in the wildfire-burned Sula State Forest, Mont., won't leave enough snags and downed trees for wildlife and forest rejuvenation.

  • New Mexico loggers get 'police power'

    In New Mexico, environmentalists are aghast at a new law, approved by legislators of both parties, that gives counties 'police power' to cut trees in national forests threatened by fire.

  • After the fires, Part I

    An introduction to this issue's lead story and the next talks about the need for changes in the Forest Service's fire policy, especially in the West.

  • The Big Blowup

    A historian of fire recalls the "Big Blowup" of 1910, an explosion of wildfire in Idaho that took 78 lives, made a hero of ranger Ed Pulaski, and helped to share a century of fire policy on the national forests.

  • Back into the woods

    In the wake of last summer's devastating Western wildfires, the Forest Service is trying to figure out how to restore the unhealthy, doghair, fire-prone forests created by a century of fire suppression and indiscriminate logging.

  • The West's fire survivors

    A look at the Intermountain West's trees notes how the different species adapt to and even profit from periodic fires.

  • Making forests safe again won't be a walk in the park

    On Arizona's Coconino National Forest outside of Flagstaff, foresters are working to thin the overgrown, doghair woods to prevent catastrophic wildfires.

  • The year it rained money

    A Forest Service employee talks about the intoxicating influence and "cargo cult" side effects of Forest Service firefighting money on small Western towns like hers.

  • Tragedy re-ignites wildfire debate

    After the Thirty Mile Fire in Washington's Methow Valley takes the lives of four firefighters, some say the fire should never have been fought.

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