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  • Drawing a line in the mud

    In Colorado, The Nature Conservancy begins a battle against the exotic invader tamarisk, hoping to make the San Miguel River tamarisk-free before the plant takes over entirely.

  • The Eucalyptus: Sacred or profane?

    The writer says that California's much-prized eucalyptus trees are really overgrown, fire-prone weeds that would be better off in their native Australia.

  • The garden of good and evil

    Because invasive and noxious weeds can spread by planting popular wildflowers seed mixes available at nurseries and stores, it is better to purchase separate flower species when planning a garden.

  • Exotic-killing herbicide is ousted from the range

    In its attempt to eradicate cheatgrass in Idaho, the BLM contaminated crops with the herbicide, Oust, which led to a lawsuit stopping the spraying, while the weed continues to spread.

  • Scientists uncover a weevil gourmand

    Flower-head weevils released in Colorado's Gunnison National Forest to eat invasive Canada thistles seem to prefer other thistles instead and have no impact on the weeds.

  • Aliens in the Backyard: Plant and Animal Imports to America

    John Leland’s book, Aliens in the Backyard, discusses both the dangers and the benefits arising from the vast number of exotic species in North America – including human beings

  • Tackling tamarisk

    The exotic woody shrub known as tamarisk or saltcedar has infested the West's river systems, but scientists are divided over how to fight it, or whether it is even possible to do so in a degraded landscape.

  • Killing tamarisk frees water

    New Mexico's dried-up, tamarisk-choked Spring Lake comes back to life when the tamarisk is removed, inspiring the Pecos River Native Riparian Restoration Project to tackle tamarisk on the river.

  • Fighting exotics with exotics

    Entomologist Jack DeLoach's proposal to release exotic insects to fight the exotic tamarisk raises questions about the successes and pitfalls of biocontrol.

  • It’s ‘bombs away’ on New Mexico saltcedar

    The state of New Mexico is beginning an aerial herbicide assault on the exotic shrub saltcedar, or tamarisk, but some fear spraying Arsenal along the Rio Grande could harm native cottonwoods

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